BABY

Summertime simplicity, by Soor Ploom

Ivy in Soor Ploom
Ivy and Marlow wearing Soor Ploom
Ivy and Marlow in Soor Ploom
girls in Soor Ploom
Marlow_Soor Ploom
silly girls in Soor Ploom
Can we start talking about summer yet, or is it too soon?! At least we can start buying cute summery pieces in preparation for the warm, sunny days ahead, right?

Soor Ploom is one of my very favourite brands for girls and I think their pieces sum up those sweet, simple summer days in the most perfect of ways. The pieces are so effortlessly beautiful, breezy, and just so adorable — a perfect mix of gorgeous fabrics and simple, easy-to-wear shapes. Just look at this season’s collection — everything is just so, so pretty.

Soor Ploom SS15
girls outside in Soor Ploom
girls outside wearing Soor Ploom
green dress by Soor Ploom
Marlow outside wearing Soor Ploom

Photographer Sarah Winborn was in town from Berlin recently and stopped by to take some photos of the girls. I couldn’t help but dress them up in their new Soor Ploom pieces and pretend the weather was warmer than it actually was. ; ) I hope you don’t mind me sharing some (loads of!) photos from last week’s photoshoot.

The new Soor Ploom collection is up online and available in limited quantities. Ivy is wearing the Jade Philomela Dress and the Gingham Playsuit, and Marlow is wearing the Ines Romper in the pretty sunspot fabric.

Courtney x

All photos are by Sarah Winborn. You can view her website here and follow her on Instagram here.


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Comments (49)

Marleen
April 8, 2015

HI Courtney, may I ask where Ivy’s cute sandals are from?


April 12, 2015

Sorry for taking over, Courtney, but these beauties are Saltwater Sandals, I buy them over here: http://www.salt-watersandals.com/


Helena
April 14, 2015

Marlow’s are saltwater, but Ivy’s are not.


Danielle
April 8, 2015

Hi! I want to say that I love the babyccino blog and have been following it for quite sometime! All the clothes you ladies review and recommend are beautiful! My only problem…. As a single mom of constantly growing four year old twin girls, I can’t afford or even justify spending so much on a single outfit for them both, even though I know the clothes that you blog about are made of great quality fabric and are made to last. I was just wondering if you would ever have a post suggesting some wonderful brands at a lower price range? Keep staying fabulous ladies!


Ana
April 8, 2015

I agree, and it makes a lot of sense too, given the crisis situation that so many countries around the world are now going through (also Europe, if not especially). It’s just, really, impossible for so many parents to buy a €100,00 tiny dress, unthinkable even.
Thank you!


papijane
April 8, 2015

to be honest, we have the opportunity to buy besides clothes like this brand for our children. but we do not do. it is foolish to spend so much money for little while. they do not even know what it is … I prefer that they get dirty in the mud instead of running after them.


April 8, 2015

Danielle and Ana, I can understand your dilemma and have a few suggestions: shop end of season sales for the following year. For example, at the end of this spring, you may be able to find great markdowns on higher end brands that your little ones can wear next spring! Also – many of the brands Babyccino features make clothes with generous sizing, so you could purchase a dress or romper that is one size larger and probably get 2 years of wear out of it. I’ve done this quite a bit for my girls! Gap and Uniqlo seem to have found a great middle ground of making quality clothing at a lower price point. They almost always have classic silhouettes available in each season’s collection. If you are stateside, I highly recommend J Crew’s Crew Cut and Crew Cut Factory lines. Again – the sales can be a great time to snap up some good deals on high quality clothing. Hope that’s helpful – it IS possible to classically dress your children on a budget…and remember you’ve already given your children the best gift – your love.


Jo
April 8, 2015

I was just in tears reading this article (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-32193943), then clicked over to this blog. The disparity between the two is heartbreaking, obscene even.


Emma
April 8, 2015

I’m glad someone has said this as I also completely agree. Beautiful handmade clothes but at these prices they are simply unattainable for many, and for others, they don’t necessarily see the need or sense to spend so much on one piece of child’s everyday clothing which they will inevitably grow out of quickly.

I think Annie’s suggestions are great but would love to hear from the Babyccino girls. I love their style and fully support small business but a bit more accessibility wouldn’t go amiss 🙂


April 9, 2015

here are a couple of my suggestions: I often buy clothes for my kids at my local supermarket called Monoprix (Courtney and Esther run over every time they come visit). I also like a label called Alice à Paris aliceaparis.com which is very french and has great basics. Zara is a big favorite in our house, as is Mango Kids, though it is a bit hit and miss. Last years collection was lovely, this year I am not so fond of it. Another great label, though a little bit pricer, is Cos.com which has so lovely simple clothes which are excellent quality btw. For me that works as I have 2 girls which are 2 years apart, so recycling is key! Uniqlo.com has great basics, especially for the winter. (I also love Uniqlo for myself)!


April 10, 2015

I guess I try and mix & match – I like looking at posts like this for inspiration and then I either shop the sales or try and find bits in cheaper shops/EBay. I second Emilie’s suggestion of Monoprix – I always stock up every time we are in Paris. I wish I could afford to dress my daughter in these clothes but I just can’t (not head to toe anyway) but I do enjoy looking at them much in the way I like looking at Vogue but being more selective with my own clothes.

I don’t think just because there is crisis in other parts of the world should expensive children’s clothes just not exist – the reader just needs to be aware that this is advertorial, not actual real life. (which can be hard to remember sometimes, when following lots of expensive kids brands on Instagram!)


Esther in Amsterdam
April 12, 2015

I second Emilie — Monoprix, Gap, Zara, Alice a Paris, also Du Pareil Au Meme. Here in the Netherlands, I go to Hema for organic basics (t-shirts, underwear). I think it is a great topic for a post — we’ll work on it! xxx


Nina
April 8, 2015

Beautiful pictures! Amazing how big Marlow already looks compared to Ivy. My youngest boy is just 19months. These wee ones sprout like bean stalks!


April 8, 2015

sweet !


April 8, 2015

Lovely photos!! x


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papijane
April 8, 2015

to be honest, we have the opportunity to buy besides clothes like this brand for our children. but we do not do. it is foolish to spend so much money for little while. they do not even know what it is … I prefer that they get dirty in the mud instead of running after them


Rachel
April 8, 2015

Another expensive advert. Don’t bloggers do disclosure anymore? I don’t believe that these outfits were paid for. And if they have to be shipped from the USA to Europe, add on even more, especially vat in the UK. It’s good practice to say if you paid for the outfits or not.


Mel
April 8, 2015

Isn’t the problem that handmade, ethically sourced clothes can never be sold cheaply due to the kudos of it being hand made etc… You can replicate some of these styles if you cherry pick places like Zara and Gap but I think many mothers (on here) don’t agree with buying high street for one reason or another.
I personally love some of the higher end brands and have purchased myself but I am horrified by how much they charge. The mark up is crazy when you consider there is very little intricacy in these clothes. Even if you buy the more expensive Liberty fabric from Liberty’s yourself you only need a metre for a 3 year old’s dress it would cost less than £30 to make a dress yourself, let alone an unamed fabric, but who has the time to do it themselves ? So yes it would be interesting to hear of any brands\mothers making this style of clothing at a cheaper price point.


Emma
April 8, 2015

Mel, I actually do know a lady that makes Liberty handmade smock tops and dresses between £20 – £30. I have purchased a few, great quality and she can do custom orders. She doesn’t run her work as a fully fledged business (no website) but she does do local SW London market fairs etc and can no doubt post. Happy to send details.


April 10, 2015

Emma- can you email me the details? That sounds great. I love to make my daughter things from Liberty fabric but in reality I work full time and just don’t have any spare time 🙂


Susan M.
April 9, 2015

What sweet clothes, and I, too, am stuck with dilemma of quickly growing kids, and little time to shop, and low budget for clothes. So ideas for getting clothes at a lower price most welcome.
On a different topic, since I started following this blog and instagram, I have been beguiled by both Ivy’s and Marlow’s hair. Courtney, how do you do those sweet buns, and other quick do’s? A hair tutorial would be fantastic! My daughter is approaching 2 and is ready to have her hair done up sometimes, but I have no idea what to do, don’t want a young toddler to get barrettes, etc, in her mouth or rip everything out. (for my son, I cut his hair and manage fine; I’ve done my daughter’s bangs/fringe, but would love to know how you manage to do Marlow’s so well.). Thanks again!


papijane
April 9, 2015

Hah i see also you don’t very openmind. Do you prefere that i write “oh yeah fantastic you are vert ethic, i love the way you spent your money”? Sorry, it’s just ridicilous.


Evelyn
April 9, 2015

Yes, it is very helpful to be discussing price point, as many of us are so inspired by these beautiful brands but really cannot afford them. It is true, you do have to hunt around to find good quality clothing at a good price and this often takes a lot of patience, time, thinking ahead and how to get the most out of a purchase (see tips below). On top of that, shipping also has to be taken into account — I am in Australia, so it is often quite ridiculous! So far I have discovered the following brands to offer good discounts:

Mabo sometimes have free shipping promotions or members sales if you sign up for their emails or watch their Instagram (you might miss out on the popular things this way, but I have bought bits and pieces at the end of the season with 40% off, making them much more affordable).

Olive Juice have an amazing outlet section with gorgeous children’s clothes with a vintage feel (lots to stock up on here, they have lovely cardigans, blouses, skirts, dresses & well priced essentials all on sale) and I think Courtney has mentioned this brand on the blog before.

I must recommend my favourite local brand Sunny & Dear, who make wonderful skirts out of vintage fabrics at a wonderful price — I have bought many of these for my little girl and we get so many compliments! They are quite generous in size so can last you a few years and through different seasons (free shipping for Australian purchases, not sure how much the overseas shipping is).

I have also noticed La Coqueta kids shoes are very affordable during the end of season sales. Also watch their Instagram, they sometimes have flash sales too.

As Annie from Brimful recommended, it really is about navigating your way through the sales, looking out for free shipping and being a savvy shopper. Try to choose pieces that are gender neutral, so that if you are paying a bit more for an item, it is something that can be passed down to any other children that come along (e.g. coats, shoes & wellies, knitted jumpers). Buy things that will last a good year or more, and will work across the different seasons, e.g. look for a spring/summer dress that is generous in length and can also work for the cooler weather, layered with tights and knits. In all of this, I have found it is important to set yourself a limit and stick to it. This will be different for all of us, as we all think differently on how much is reasonable to spend on clothing, whether for ourselves or our children — and why we think this way depends on so many factors, such as our upbringing, our current financial situation, where we live, etc.

Hopefully this was of help to some of you. I’m sure others have some tips they can share — if so please do!


Sofia
April 9, 2015

Thank you, Evelyn, your tips as well as Annie’s are helpful. I always buy during the sales for us, adults, and for the kids, trying to find good quality-prices pieces – not easy! But even if I could afford these extremely expensive brands, I would not spend my money on it, honestly, it makes no sense for the reasons pointed out already.
I really like babyccino blog especially for the beautiful/inspiring pictures/ideas/books… but it seems to be more and more distant from the world’s reality – why? considering their writers frequently travel around the world, they should have the knowledge and be able to present a wider range of prices. I hope this can happen in the future.
Thank you.
Sofia


Evelyn
April 10, 2015

All good points Sofia — I agree with you, the majority of brands on this blog are extremely expensive and most of us could never spend our money in this way (even with the sales). Maybe a few of us mums should start a new blog recommending affordable brands? 😛


April 9, 2015

Though I love love love babyccino and their writers I have to agree with the previous comments.
I am not a mom yet, but an auntie and a lot of friends of mine have children so I know a bit about the topic of clothing and money. I don`t know that many people who can afford clothes like these (though they are beautiful and I also love finding ethically and handmade clothes – but at another price range).

And I guess if one day I will be a mom and could afford such expensive clothes I couldn`t – knowing how many children in this world have (almost) nothing to wear. I`d rather spend my money on a sponsorship for a child through one of the organizations who are caring for children worldwide. I know this is such a tricky and complex topic and it`s my very own, personal opinion.

I am not blaming anyone for investing their money in good, handmade stuff – Courtney, I hope you don`t feel harassed by this. Please don`t!
xx


Danielle
April 9, 2015

It’s so nice to know that I’m not the only one who only wishes they could afford some of the beautiful clothes shown on babyccino. Thank you Annie for the reply, I had never heard of uniqlo before, and they have some wonderful clothes at great prices. The matter of buying clothes for next season while on sale is a good point, I’m just hesitant to gamble knowing just how much they will grow in the mean time. I speak for myself, and I’m sure many others, when I say these comments are not for the purpose of ganging up on Courtney or the ladies at babyccino. Maybe we are the minority of this community on this blog, but it would be lovely to see some more affordable options shown from time to time.


krissy
April 9, 2015

I love reading this blog, but I also have to agree with the comments above. I appreciate and understand that the blog is part of the Babyccino brand and business and as such will of course also promote it. However, it would be really great if blog posts that openly promote expensive clothing (pretty as it may be) are occasional with majority focus being on things that really do matter/make a difference/inspire family values/discuss different points of views/tips of topics relevant to every kid. All of you have Babyccino ladies are such inspiring mamas, and yes, of course, pretty dresses have their places in growing up, but the posts that seem to generate the most gratitude from you readers seem to be ones that don’t focus on aesthetics and dig deeper into issues/provide view points and inspire by example. I hope you don’t take this personally, I am a big fan of this space.


Emilie in Paris
April 9, 2015

Ladies, please don’t worry, we always welcome feedback from our readers, whatever the subject and always take it to heart.
We have also in the past reviewed a lot of inexpensive brands. (part of the problem of a blog is that posts quickly disappear).
Finding the right balance between the post topics is always a tricky thing. We really enjoy writing about crafts/ family/ tips etc. but we do also like discovering new brands, especially brands that are independent, self-starters, often run by woman and where the clothes are often locally made. This often come with a higher price tag. I personally find these brands inspirational and like the stories behind them.
BTW. one of the things Esther, Courtney and I do is to inherit kids clothes from one child to to next. I recently saw Courtney’s Marlow in a little dress that I had handed on to Esther’s Ava after my two daughters had worn it! So cute.


April 9, 2015

Emilie, I think its hard for readers to understand sometimes just how much time and cost goes into creating beautiful children’s clothes. As you, Courtney, and Esther well know – for a brand to make any kind of profit, the appropriate wholesale cost has to be factored….and when made in small batches, the final price point is going to be higher. There’s no other way around it. I also love the stories behind the brands – perhaps a post sharing more of the inner workings of a few of your favorite brands would be enlightening to your readers? As with a lot of popular blogs, many people seem to have a misconception as to how difficult it is to be successful at it. This blog and portal is what it is because you ladies have put nearly a decade of dedicated blogging, research, and collaboration into it. Keep it up! And handmedowns? Always more comfortable the second or third time around ;).


April 10, 2015

I’m glad you’ve responded Emilie and not seen this discussion as criticism, which I am sure none of these posts are intended as, just discussion between women (mostly, at least, although men not excluded!) who are concerned and interested about what their children wear, wish to shop ethically and aesthetically but also earn a realistic salary. For example, my husband and I both work full time, earn a reasonable income, and care about the providence of our clothes, but we just cannot afford to dress us or our daughter head to toe in handmade or beautiful clothes from small independent businesses, much as we would like to. We understand why things are that price and how businesses run, but understanding does not mean that the goods sold are attainable to us.

I also imagine but don’t know for certain that you ladies benefit from free/discounted/loaned clothes. I would hope that one of the perks of running a shopping portal/event like this is access to the clothes/goods. Certainly on my blog, if I review something at the request of a brand, I expect to be sent it free…

You are also lucky to be able to pass them on/receive handed down clothes. I am the first of my friends to have children, so those coming after in my family/friendship group are benefiting now from my hours spent trawling independent shops, EBay and charity shops plus judicious quick sale buying often a year ahead!

Anyway, an essay, but I really enjoying in the engagement element of blogs, so thank you!


Danielle
April 9, 2015

I don’t think it’s that we need to be enlightened. I think most of us grasp how much time, and money goes in to making the clothes. I think what we’re talking about is their suggestions for more affordable clothing, which Emilie has given us a response to. I honestly think it’s rather ill mannered to assume that we don’t understand, that we need to be enlightened, or that we have misconceptions simply for asking for suggestions. It seems as though if we are unable to afford the pricy clothing, we should be thought of as daft.


April 9, 2015

Danielle – perhaps my use of “enlightened” was the wrong choice of word. My apologies – I absolutely did not mean to imply that it’s silly to ask about affordable brands. On the contrary, your original question was a very good one! The backend workings of a small brand can be ever so interesting – that’s all I meant :). Cheers!


Mel
April 9, 2015

A lot of magazines feature a ‘steal vs spree’ page i.e., a £200 blouse and a £50 one both of similar style. Perhaps that may appease and be helpful to your readers. It seems to me that you have a very wide demographic in terms of spending power, which is perhaps unusual. More work 🙁 but it could be fun!


Danielle
April 10, 2015

Annie- thank you for the reply. I was hoping your comment wasn’t meant ‘as an insult’, but I still felt the need to speak up. Maybe it’s my weakness for the underdogs of the world lol I’m glad the misunderstanding is cleared up 🙂


Helena
April 11, 2015

One fabulous much more affordable children’s label is What Mother Made. My daughter has been in their pleat front dungarees for years. I am only sharing this now I have bought what I would like from the new collection! ha.


April 12, 2015

(I’m currently running a fever and English isn’t my first language so excuse me if something sounds a bit off) I feel the need to weigh in and I’d like to start by saying that I totally and 100% agree with everything that has been said already. It’s more than understandable that people feel like the clothes that are presented here aren’t affordable for people with a ‘normal’ income. I don’t earn a ton of money myself (rather the opposite, really) but I still prefer to spent it on ethically produced, beautifully made clothing for my kid and I. I simply prefer to put some money aside for a few months instead of spending it on a massive amount of cheap clothing. I’ve come to realize (something that I didn’T know before Sam was born) that kids don’t actually need very much. My son doesn’t have a huge wardrobe, a few pants, shirts and jumpers are more than enough for him. SInce the quality of the clothes I buy is very, very high, I’m confident that his clothes will be worn by 3 or more children after him. Furthermore, I prefer to support ‘real’ people who are transparent about their production and the origin of the fabrics they use than huge cooperations such as H+M, zara, Cos (which is also H+M) and co. whose profit margin is simply ridicolous and whose labour politics is more than questionable. I want to thank Esther, Courtney and Emilie for supporting small businesses and introducing me to so many beautiful, family-run brands. Without wanting to sound cheesy (can’T avoid it, I guess): you really opened my eyes!
Beautiful photos by Sarah, too!


Esther
April 13, 2015

I agree with the above ladies myself. And I say this as a reader of this blog and Instagram who absolutely adores the ladies and their children for various reasons. But I have also wondered about disclosing the amount of stuff that they receive as part of a company’s promotion. I reckon that it’s an incredible amount of clothes and accessories.

I was surprised a few weeks ago when Courtney posted a photo of her two girls with holes in their tights saying that it’s the end of season and how she would hate spending money on tights. Well, maybe buy them at a local store? Tesco in England, for instance? Or H&M? Very inexpensive.

I spend a lot of money on my twins’ clothes and shoes (especially shoes) and my children can’t even inherit them but I do not buy underwear from Petit Bateau! I’d rather get them from Zara, H&M and Mini Boden- but definately get new ones if there are any holes! PS: I did get the raincoats from Petit Bateau on sale though!

Again, I say all this for all due respect to the ladies, their families and their beliefs. And for sharing photos of their families on Instagram. The photos are always stunning!


teacakebiscuit
April 13, 2015

For anyone lusting after the Liberty print clothing…. I made my children some clothing in the fabric last summer as I adore how it looks, but I feel compelled to warn that it isn’t really entirely what I would call suitable for your everyday playwear as the fabric is so delicate. It’s fine for standing against a wall posing for a photograph sort of thing, but as far as running around a playground and such (which I would like to think that most children do every day for a least a little bit), the tana lawn just wouldn’t stand up to it. One fall in some Liberty print trousers onto a tarmac floor and there would be tear for certain be it on a knee or on an elbow. Repeated skidding down a slide in in the park and the fabric would be threadbare within no time. Also all the clothing needs to be ironed after the wash too so it’s not low maintenance either. I love how the girls on this blog look, but their wardrobes must requite so much ironing. Incidentally, I made little pairs of trousers for my 2 year old. I used about 1/2 meter of fabric per pair which cost me about EUR15, and each pair took about an hour to make. A simple little dress or top would probably a similarly short amount of time. There is no justification for items such as these to cost so much…. Contrary to how it might seem, using a sewing machine is not difficult at all, there are plenty of instructional guides around for what seams to use. I would encourage everyone to have a go as for the price of one of these dresses advertised, you can buy yourself a cheap sewing machine and whip up as many as you may please! For patterns, I highly recommend citronille.fr. Beautiful designs (note, sizing is french and comes up a little small). I would also like to throw in a recommendation to NEXT for children’s clothing. Sometimes it’s a bit hit or miss, but on the whole I find it washes a lot better than Zara which washes terribly in my experience. Hope that somebody finds this useful. (incidentally, I completely fell for the advertising and bought a very sweet little dress for my two year old that I’d seen on Marlow and spent a small fortune on it only to discover that the quality was more like Zara and the colour faded horribly and that it’s started to lose its shape. Learned my lesson about being suckered into Truman-show-like advertising, lol!


Kelly
April 14, 2015

I enjoy reading the blog and Courtney’s Instagram. I am aware that these ladies are given their children’s clothing, so I don’t try to compare my children’s wardrobe to theirs. Though I have always dressed my children in simple, graphic free clothing out of personal preference (even though I am in the US ;0)

I assume there are people who can afford the pricey European clothes, but for me I draw inspiration here.

I recently found a dress, shopping second hand, that was labeled NANOS. It was beautiful, $6, and it was just fun to feel like I was getting a little piece of European fashion! I was only familiar with the brand name because of reading babyccinokids blog.


Haley
April 14, 2015

Interesting feedback on this subject. I think there is an issue now that there is a lack of transparency on this blog and the IG feeds. The clothes that are ‘endorsed; by Courtney (we assume) are not paid for by her and I think it is really easy to lose sight of how crazy it is to spend so much money on children clothes when you get them for free in exchange for your endorsement. I think it would be really good practice for Courtney to label the posts as sponsored or paid for in future which is what they are if she didn’t pay for those clothes. That would make it more honest and palatable for readers. It is only human that other mums being ‘marketed’ to will feel resentment at being expected to pay to get the look. This is meant with full respect – transparency is surely at the heart of what your blog is about.


Helena
April 15, 2015

Agreed, Haley. Other blogs I follow are totally transparent. I would like to see the same here.


Emma
April 15, 2015

I agree with the above posts about disclosure. It is very obvious that the authors of Babyccino receive many products for free. Other blogs are very clear about which posts are sponsored and which are not.


Courtney in London
April 15, 2015

I’m sorry I haven’t had the chance to chime in here yet, but I was away on holiday this past week and didn’t have my computer with me.
I just wanted to thank everyone for their comments and to clarify one thing…
This post is not sponsored. We always mention when a post is and try to be as transparent as possible!
Sarah Winborn emailed last month to let me know she would be in town and we arranged for her to come and take some photos of my children because I really, really love her style of photography. I chose to dress my girls in their Soor Ploom clothes because it is one of my favourite brands and I think the pieces really are so beautiful and special. I had been in touch with the brand’s owner, Marissa, for more than 6 months. She shared her Lookbook with me way before the clothes went into production and I pre-ordered a few of my favourite pieces from her way back then. I’ve been looking forward to receiving them ever since, and they happened to arrive just in time for Sarah’s visit.
I agree that the prices are really high, but I believe you get what you pay for in terms of quality and craftsmanship. All of the Soor Ploom pieces are designed and made in Brooklyn, NY, many of the finishings are done by hand, and there is so much time and love that goes into every single piece. I love supporting these independent brands (many of them run by fellow mothers!) and have chosen to invest in a few of these pieces for my kids, knowing they are special and they will be passed down from one child to the next.

I agree that talking about children’s fashion is unimportant when you compare it to all the other more serious issues in the world, but this blog is a place where we offer a variety of topics and I think (hope)that people visit our site and enjoy the mixture of posts and can choose to focus on what interests them the most. We review our favourite children’s books, share easy and tasty recipes, discuss parenting topics and trends, post about craft projects and decor ideas, review handy products for babies and kids… and we also talk about children’s fashion, with a focus on independent children’s labels we know and love.

Nothing makes us more happy than comments and interactions from/between our readers, and we are always so happy to receive feedback and suggestions, and even to have our ideas challenged. But I don’t think it’s necessary for everyone to love every single post we publish. It’s a bit like a magazine – sometimes I skim over stories that don’t interest me, or clothes that are way above my budget (or even just not my style) — not everything is for me, but I like to find inspiration and ideas from the majority of the content, and I will continue to read for the inspiration. We hope this blog will appeal to you for the same reason.

Anyway, this turned out to be a much longer comment than I intended, but I just wanted to share my thoughts. I’m sorry if this post came across as being sponsored.

Thank you again for commenting here. xx


April 16, 2015

Excellent response – but of course I wouldn’t expect anything less!


Marleen
April 16, 2015

I totally agree with Courtney. I like to get inspired by the clothes shown on the blog. I like to use my creativity to search for similar clothes but for more affordable prices, but use the blog for inspiration. Labels like Monoprix (love it), Next, Zara, H&M (skip Disney though), GAP and in the Netherlands Hema sometimes have items in their collections which match in style but are much cheaper. Although I agree that it is much more sustainable to invest in items of quality and craftmanship, it is not always possible. My mother makes lovely skirts of Liberty fabric for my daughter, so sweet and very affordable. Furthermore I search internet for good offers / sale of brands like Petit Bateau, Jacadi, Pom d’api and others. I often save 50% or more and buy also bigger sizes when good offers are there.

Remains my question of the first post…where are Ivy’s sandals from? Marlow’s are Saltwater sandals but the other? Thanks!


Courtney in London
April 16, 2015

Thanks Marleen. And I agree with you about buying in the sales — even sizes that are too big that you know your kids will grow in to. That is so smart!

And Ivy’s sandals are by Angulus, but they’re from last season so I don’t know if they’re still available: http://www.angulus.dk

x


Marleen
April 16, 2015

Thanks Courtney!


May 1, 2015

Hi everyone,

I am a huge fan of Babyccinokids and the beautiful clothes that she puts on Ivy and Marlow. I am also a single working mother. For years, I have been investing in beautiful childrens clothes for my girls from great brands (like Soor Ploom, Bonpoint, Bonton). I find that well made clothes wash well and make me happy, and what I do to afford them is I re-sell them on ebay. It’s a great way to earn back what you spent, reduce the costs for great clothes for kids and also pass along a beautiful dress, etc. to another mom that wants it. It’s a win/win. Follow girlsongreenwich on ebay and in the fall 2015 we will launch a curated consignment store online for moms (girlsongreenwich.com). Our landing page will be live on May 8th so you can register and you can also follow girlsongreenwich on instagram.


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